Coverage | New Indian Express
There are three million women prostitutes in India, with 1.2 million being young girls aged between nine and 12 years. To counter this alarming fact of existence, veteran photographer Kejriwal propelled a significant movement, Missing.There are three million women prostitutes in India, with 1.2 million being young girls aged between nine and 12 years. To counter this alarming fact of existence, veteran photographer Kejriwal propelled a significant movement, Missing.

Read More

Coverage | The Hindu
Kejriwal’s research had uncovered some shocking figures — there are reportedly three million trafficked women in India, and 1.2 million of them are young girls. She wanted to translate this information into something that was emotive and evocative. “I had thought about using walls to express myself, but in India it’s very hard to create longstanding art project on public walls as they are used for various purposes and are often defaced upon. Then I hit upon the idea of using the blue sky as my canvas.”

Read More

Coverage | The Logical Indian
The project pertains to painting larger than life figures of girls in black silhouettes, dedicated to the estimated tens of thousands of girls who disappear in India every year, understood to be victims of commercial sex trafficking. It is common for traffickers to buy young girls from rural areas and bring them to Indian cities to groom them for future sex work when they hit puberty.

Read More

Coverage | The Pioneer
The idea of Missing was first seen at the India Art Fair last year with an outdoor installation by Kejriwal which comprised three sculptures. This project is already working on awareness drives and has initiated ground level, pan-India projects like a stencil project where students and artists are working with girls rescued from red light areas to stencil ‘Missing’ silhouettes on the city walls.

See More

Coverage | The Better India
She is anonymous, faceless, lifeless, dark and voiceless. But she shouts out loud for the millions of young girls who are trafficked every year in the country.

See More

Coverage | The Sunday Tribune
What made her move towards installations when photography itself is an eloquent and three-dimensional medium? Firstly, she doesn’t consider herself a photographer out to capture moments frozen in time. Instead she says, “I am interested in multiple journeys, multiple moments”.

Read More

COVERAGE | THE TELEGRAPH
As a mentor for Art Mela, a senior school project at Modern High School for Girls (MHS), Kejriwal had introduced some of her students to MISSING and its goals. “We went through a five-day brainstorming session. It made us re-evaluate our lives and come face to face with some harsh truths,” said Sakshi Jalan, a former student of MHS who has joined the cause.

Read More

Coverage | Bangalore Mirror
All of 16, Ismat Ara’s young life was brutally disrupted when she woke up to find herself, drugged and drowsy, in a dark, cramped room. When she tried to escape and scream for help, they broke her legs, hit her in the head and physically tortured her till she resigned to her fate. But Ara is a survivor. There are many like Ara who are forced to into the sex trade — a burgeoning billion-dollar industry across the globe.
Coverage | Millennium Post
Curator Shaheen Merali enunciates, “The work of artist Leena Kejriwal is part of a greater body of work undertaken by artists in the global context, where artists combine their skills to enable a wider society to communicate.”

Read More

Coverage | Sheroes
While I thought that the response to the project would be slow, right from the launch to the crowdfunding campaign to the stencil project being taken up by volunteers around the world, it has grown steadily. We have followers writing in from all corners of the globe, supporting us and showing their solidarity with the cause, which is amazing and inspiring.
Coverage | Homegrown
The project premiered at the India Art Fair, in 2014, where it was greatly received and the crowd-funding campaign on Wishberry reached its goal too. However, Kejriwal herself hasn’t reached her goal; girls still go missing on a daily basis, and most of them are never heard from again nor found. It’s a sad reality but one that is forced upon a growing number of Indian girls.

Read More

Coverage | YourStory
“When I first entered into a red light area in the city, I was overwhelmed by what I saw. My camera became a natural extension of me. It has been a tool of artistic expression since I started rediscovering my city.”

Read More

Coverage | The Quint
While the idea of the sale of human beings in the ‘modern’ 21st century is analogous to barbarism, most of us are probably oblivious to the fact that human trafficking is a global issue

Read More

COVERAGE | POLKA CAFE
“We’re targeting the educated lot because a lot of people don’t know the magnitude of this issue. The problem is huge and the gender statistics can really go crazy, if we don’t do something about it. There was a time when everyone spoke about going green, carbon footprints and CFC-consciousness. That’s the kind of awareness that has to be generated now.”

Read More

Coverage | Little Black Book
You can spot the Missing Project’s artwork in Bangalore at Church Street and near the Sadashivnagar underpass, among other places. The group has also collaborated with ten NGOs around India for a national awareness campaign, giving out useful information like helpline numbers and contacts of nearby NGOs, particularly in vulnerable areas.

Read More

Missing Stencil awareness campaign with the childline number in Kolkata, #missinggirls
Coverage | Mashable
Photographer and artist Kejriwal’s Missing project aims to bring the issue of trafficking of women into India’s public spaces by combining art, activism and technology. The crowd-funded public art project places larger-than-life black silhouettes of ‘missing’ girls on streets and landmarks. People can interact with each piece through a mobile app, which sheds more light on the issue of trafficking of women and girls in India.

Read More

Coverage | Hope & Fortune
The issue slowly came to the fore front in all my works. And i choose to work on a Public art project for this in particular to make the masses sit up and take notice. There is lesser knowledge about it in a country like ours, there is a lot to be done.

Read More

Coverage | Gulf News
Cities such as Kolkata have had a long tradition of political graffiti which attracted attention long before activists actually hit the streets. In 2015, a simple stencilled black silhouette of a young girl appeared on city walls with the hashtag #Missing. It was a public art project to raise awareness about sex trafficking by photographer and artist Leena Kejriwal.

Read More

Coverage | The Goodwill Project
I have been working on the issue of sexual trafficking and commodification of sex for a while now. When I started out, the large installations used layers of vinyl, paper, prints, lights and rope and succeeded in generating a very graphic experience. But, it was too complicated for everyone to understand. So I decided to simplify the language.

Read More

Coverage | CSR Journal
‘Missing’, an initiative to raise awareness and drive public action towards prevention of human trafficking was launched in Mumbai. The Missing app, a smartphone application featuring a list of current petitions, nearby NGOs and other links that support public action on the issue was also launched. Missing, a changemaker initiative by Yes Foundation focuses on creating mindset transformation to cut the demand for trafficking.
Coverage | Al Jazeera
Shabnam Sisodiya is a 23-year-old who was rescued from a brothel a few years ago. She is now in high school and lives at New Light, an anti sex-trafficking NGO in Kolkata, which is helping her to reintegrate into society. Sisodiya helped with some of the stencilled images and says: “Young girls are tricked into prostitution by men in various ways, including false promises of marriage, a home in a big city, a lucrative job or lots of money.”

Read More

Coverage | A Mighty Girl
“Astonishingly, if you enslave someone in South Asia, you are at a greater risk of being hit by lightning than going to jail! Despite the magnitude of the issue, few people really know what’s going on.”

Read More

Coverage | Jadavpur DNA
From over a decade, she has been working towards creating awareness about sex trafficking. She was first introduced to the heinousness of this practice when she visited one of the red light areas in Kalighat in Kolkata as part of a photography walk. This issue has been a recurring theme in her works since. ‘Missing’ is also a step in that direction. “I want to wham into people’s heads that commodification of human body is not ethical,” states Kejriwal.
Coverage | Platform
The average age of girls disappearing has gone down from 12 to 9 years and most of them are going into sexual slavery. If we as populace don’t address it, who will? It is the demand, which creates a supply. If we turn away today thinking it’s not my issue, I am in my own way siding with pimps and traffickers! What did the little girls do to face this inhuman behavior?

Read More

Missing Installations at India Art Fair 2014
COVERAGE | DAWN
The outdoor installation called M.I.S.S.I.N.G. by artist Leena Kejriwal is a visual response to alarming research showing a gaping gender gap in India, which has led to severe imbalances in some parts of the country.
COVERAGE | UK GUARDIAN PHOTO-STORY
Each year in India tens of thousands of girls go missing in a country where an estimated 1.2 million children work in the sex industry. Many are abducted by commercial sex traffickers and forced into prostitution. Missing, a nationwide public art project launched by the artist Leena Kejriwal as a memorial to victims of sexual slavery, now has hundreds of participants in cities across India

Read More

Coverage | UK Guardian
The outdoor installation, M.I.S.S.I.N.G. by artist Leena Kejriwal, is a visual response to the growing gender gap in India, which has led to severe imbalances in parts of the country.

Read More

Coverage | Live Mint
If only for their size, Kolkata-based Leena Kejriwal’s silhouettes of young girls, juxtaposed against the urban skyline, catch the eye. Part of a public art project conceived especially for the IAF, M.I.S.S.I.N.G. is a memorial to the millions of girls who disappear from the face of the earth every day.
Coverage | Hindustan Times
“Big social issues like human trafficking are often left to be dealt with by NGOs and the government. Artists are too myopic, addressing these issues in their own way,” says Kejriwal. “The idea here is to bring all stakeholders, including the public, into the conversation.”